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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

Open Innovation

How Robust are the Results?

By | July 8th, 2016|Categories: Economics General, Management of Innovation, Methodology, Open Innovation, Uncategorized|

Today I have the pleasure to present some of our (Galia, Laursen, Salter and my) recent research. Here is briefly what it is about: Introduction. As stated by Hubbard, Vetter and Little (1998: 251): “The goal of science is empirical generalization, or knowledge development leading to some degree of understanding.” However, in many fields of science, the integrity of the pertinent empirical literatures are open to question because of what Rosenthal (1979) dubbed the “file drawer problem,” which implies that journals may be dominated by papers reporting results that are Type I errors (erroneous rejections of the null hypothesis), while the null outcome remain in the file drawers of researchers. In the top five journals of strategic management research, Goldfarb and King (2016) report that between 24 to 40 percent of the findings are likely the result of chance rather than a reflection of true relationships. Replication studies can help reduce this problem by establishing a set of robust empirical results (Bettis, 2012). In addition, even if we assume away the “file drawer problem”, statistical tests by nature produce Type I errors. The result is that in strategic management general and in open innovation research in particular, we know too little about which results are empirically generalizable, and hence whether they potentially add to our understanding. In many cases, however, researchers work on similar data sets and use similar or identical dependent variables, so that in principle, the robust (and not so robust) results could be extracted, while controlling for a host of other factors. When such general datasets are available, large scale replication studies can be conducted. By large-scale replication studies, we mean studies where different independent variables are included in a single empirical model with the same dependent variable. However, in these large scale replications as in most empirical applications, the “true model”, and therefore, the appropriate selection of explanatory variables, is essentially unknown, which leads to a phenomenon described as “model uncertainty” (Chatfield, 1995). Disregarding model uncertainty results in too small standard errors and too strong confidence in the statistical findings (Raftery, 1995). Additionally, it is model uncertainty that fundamentally facilitates the “file drawer problem”. […]

Foundations of Economic Change – Behavior, Interaction and Aggregate Outcome

By | July 29th, 2014|Categories: Economics of Innovation, Innovation Systems, Open Innovation, Workshop / Conference|

Currently I am attending the 15th conference of the International Joseph Alois Schumpeter Society. It is a marvelous event with a line up of speakers that is really breath-taking for all of the participants. Brian Arthur, David Audretsch, Giulio Bottazzi, Guido Buenstorf, Wesley Cohen, Herbert Dawid, Giovanni Dosi, Magda Fontana, Dominique Foray, Koen Frenken, DAniella Laureiro-Martinez, [...]

Urban agglomerations, knowledge intensive services and innovation: Establishing the core connections

By | January 25th, 2014|Categories: Economic Geography, Economics of Innovation, General, Management of Innovation, Open Innovation, Publication_Home|

It took us a while to go from an idea to an accepted paper. But now Sverre Herstad and I have received the news that our paper "Urban agglomerations, knowledge intensive services and innovation: Establishing the core connections" is accepted for publication in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development. In this paper we investigate how resources available in [...]

Best Paper Award

By | December 16th, 2013|Categories: Economics of Innovation, Management of Innovation, Open Innovation, Publication|

Recently we received the news that our paper "Open innovation practices and their effect on innovation performance" published by the International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management has received the Best Paper Award 2012 by the journal. To the best of our knowledge this paper is the first to develop a complete indicator framework for examining open [...]

One of the most downloaded articles in Applied Economic Letters

By | November 15th, 2013|Categories: Economics of Innovation, Internationalization, Management of Innovation, Open Innovation, Publication|

We have just received the notice that our paper "The relationship between international innovation collaboration, intramural R&D and SMEs innovation performance: a quantile regression approach" is among the Top 10 of the most downloaded papers in Applied Economics Letters in 2013. Currently it is free for download.

Regional Knowledge Bases & Extra-Regional Collaboration

By | October 17th, 2013|Categories: Economic Geography, Economics of Innovation, Internationalization, Open Innovation, Publication|

Recently we, that is Christina Koller, Sverre J. Herstad and I, received the news that our joint paper "Does the composition of regional knowledge bases influence extra-regional collaboration for innovation?" is published by Applied Economics Letters today. The paper emphasizes that ther is a growing research interest in the relationship between the composition of regional knowledge bases, [...]

Open innovation practices and their effect on innovation performance

By | April 3rd, 2013|Categories: Management of Innovation, Open Innovation, Publication|

We all are relieved. A paper that has been accepted for publication about 2.5 years ago, has finally been published. "Open innovation practices and their effect on innovation performance" by Carter Bloch, Sverre Herstad, Els van de Velde and myself has been published last night by International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM). The findings in [...]